Pizzicato

In conjunction with some print design refreshing that accompanied Pizzicato’s 25th anniversary last fall, they got a whole new website to go along with the refreshed brand colors and style.2015-04-08_16h59_02

One of the biggest challenges was to clarify the distinction between catering and home delivery of pizza; a long-term view of analytics data from the old site clearly showed confusion between those two pages based on user behavior (they were just going back and forth between them). The solution to that heavily relied on the second challenge:

Challenge #2: To allow users to find both the nearest Pizzicato store AND the store that delivers to their location (either current/geolocated or manually entered). With one click, ideally. Arthur handled that by creating a completely custom-built mapping/geolocating application for Pizzicato which uses Google Maps API and the store address info from the WordPress database. See that here: http://pizzicatopizza.com/#!stores

A third challenge was of course the horizontal scroll design: with WordPress, it’s a bit like fitting a square peg into a round hole. You can hammer the hell out of it, but there will be gaps in the sides of the hole and the edges of the peg will get splintered. And what I mean by that metaphor is that the WordPress admin area gets really wonky and un-intuitive anytime you have a one-page scroll. So a lot of careful thought went into the UI/UX part, and in the end, this site is actually pretty easy to figure out for admins.

On top of it all, we are using device detection to serve mobile users a completely different WordPress theme. It’s not a perfect solution, but it affords a LOT of flexibility we wouldn’t have if we’d tried to make the desktop theme responsive, AND it’s still one site to manage/update just as it would be if it was responsive.

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